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October 15, 2015

Bibliography [The Technique of the Color Woodcut]


 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Victoria and Albert Museum Handbooks. Japanese Color- prints by Edward F. Strange. London, 1910.

Containing comprehensive chapters on the history, sig. nificance, and technique of the craft as considering japan, with some sixty half-tone reproductions of outstanding prints.

Victoria and Albert Museum Catalogues. Tools and Materials Illustrating the Japanese Method of Color-printing. By Edward F. Strange. London, 1913.

A short but accurate account of Japanese practice, with diagrams of the tools employed, and descriptive paragraphs regarding colors and the various vehicles used with them.

Washington. U. S. A. National Museum. Report of the Smithsonian Institute for the year ending 30th June, 1892. Japanese Wood-cutting and Wood-cut Printing. By T. Tokuno. Washington, 1893.

The Japanese Color Wood-cut. By Walter Baedeker Mahlow. Die Kunst Schule. February, 1925.

Wood-cut Printing in Water-colors After the Japanese Manner. The Studio, London, 1894, and some articles published subsequently in the same journal.

Wood Block Printing, By F. Morley Fletcher. Pitman, London.

The first book on the recent revival of the craft in Europe, and since its publication the standard work on the subject. It contains many illustrations, including an original print by the author.

The Original Color-print Magazine, published in London by William Giles, Chenil Studios, Chelsea, 1924, 1925, 1926.

An annual publication, with an original print as supplement, containing articles on the craft and on relative subjects by living artists. A most valuable book. Among its contributors are the editor, William Giles, Allen Seaby, Y. Urushibara, Morley Fletcher, Claude Flight, George H. Viner, and W. J. Phillips.

Color Printing with Linoleum and Wood Blocks. By Allen W. Seaby. Dryad Handicrafts, Leicester.

A useful manual, written primarily for schools.

The Modern Color-print. Malcolm C. Salaman, London.

An appreciation of the work of British color printers, with an account of William Giles’ new relief-metal process.


SOME SOCIETIES OF PRINT MAKERS

The Society of Graver Printers in Color. Acting Secretary, H. W. Bromhead, 18 Cork Street, Burlington Gardens, London.

The Color Wood-cut Society, Mrs. E. C. Austen Brown, 16 Fulham Road, London.

The Society of Print Makers of California. Secretary, Howell C. Brown, 120 N. El Molino Avenue, Pasadena, California.

The Canadian Society of Graphic Arts. Secretary, C. F. Comfort, 87 St. Clair Avenue E., Toronto, Ontario.


Other illustrations found in Walter J. Phillips, The Technique of the Color Wood-cut:

  • A print by Kunisada
Caption below illustration: "From a print by Kunisada in the possession of the author."

Caption below illustration: “From a print by Kunisada in the possession of the author.”

  • A print by William Giles
Caption below illustration: "Sic transit gloria mundi, by William Giles, with a full-size fragment in color."

Caption below illustration: “Sic transit gloria mundi, by William Giles, with a full-size fragment in color.”

  • A print by John Platt
Caption below illustration: "The Jetty, Sennen Cove, by John Platt, with a full-size fragment in color."

Caption below illustration: “The Jetty, Sennen Cove, by John Platt, with a full-size fragment in color.”

  • A print by Hiroshige I
Caption below illustration: "The Shinto Temple of Masaki, Yedo, in Snow, by Hiroshige I, with a full-size fragment in color. From a print in the possession of the author."

Caption below illustration: “The Shinto Temple of Masaki, Yedo, in Snow, by Hiroshige I, with a full-size fragment in color. From a print in the possession of the author.”

  • Progressive Proofs of “The Angler” by Walter J. Phillips

angler6The Angler, a wood-cut in color, by the author. This was cut on five blocks of Canadian cherry wood. A photograph of each block is reproduced on theĀ following pages, together with an impression from each.